Surrender at Appomattox Court House, Virginia

Paroling the Army of Northern Virginia

 

The terms of the surrender allowed Confederate soldiers to be paroled and return home, instead of prison. It was not until the April 10 meeting between Grant and Lee that it was agreed each Confederate would be provided with an individual parole pass certifying that the men would not take up arms against the United States. Per Grant's instructions these passes could aid the former Confederates during their journey home, allowing them to use federal transportation (ships and trains where available) or to draw food and supplies from federally controlled stations in the South. Approximately 30,000 blank passes were printed at the Clover Hill Tavern. After the Confederates surrendered their military equipment, they were eligible to receive the pass. Some higher ranking Confederates were paroled by Federal officers, but most passes were signed by Confederate officers for the men in their commands.

 

https://www.nps.gov/apco/learn/historyculture/paroling-the-army-of-northern-virginia.htm

 

Family Members Paroled on April 9, 1865 at Appomattox Court House

 

Arthur, William M. 8th VA Inf., Co. D

Brother to John B. Arthur, my 2nd G-Grandfather

 

Skinner, J. B. Lunenburg (VA) Hvy. Arty., Drewry's Bluff Garrison

James B. Skinner, 1st cousin of Sallie Skinner Overby, my G-Grandmother, he was son of Blackwell, who was a Brother of Samuel Skinner. His pension application states he was discharged at Appomattox C. H.http://www.edavidarthur.net/JamesBSkinner.pdf

 

 

My Great-Grandfather Lee Arthur was captured after the battle of Saylerís Creek on April 6th, near Burkeville, VA.He was released from Prisoner of War at Newport News VA on July 1st 1865 after signing an Oath of Allegiance to the US.

Sayler's Creek Battlefield near Farmville, Virginia was the site of the Battle of Sayler's Creek of the American Civil War. Robert E. Lee's army was retreating from the Richmond to Petersburg line. Here, on April 6, 1865, Union General Philip Sheridan cut off and beat back about a quarter of Lee's army.

 

Samuel Skinner, my Great-Great-Grandfather, had two sons who died defending Richmond in January/February of 1865.

Cornelius V. Skinner - Age at Enlistment: 20 - Enlistment Date: 25 Jan 1862 - Rank at enlistment: Private - Enlistment Place: St John's Church, Lunenburg Co - Survived the War?: No

Service Record: Enlisted in Company Allen's, Virginia Lunenburg "Rebel" Light Artillery Battery on 25 Jan 1862. Mustered out on 26 Feb 1865 at Hospl, Chaffin's Farm, VA.- Birth Date: abt 1842

 

John C. Skinner - Enlistment Date: 1 Sep 1863 - Rank at enlistment: Private - Enlistment Place: Chaffin's Bluff, Virginia - Survived the War?: No - Service Record: Enlisted in Company Allen's, Virginia Lunenburg "Rebel" Light Artillery Battery on 01 Sep 1863.Mustered out on 12 Jan 1865 Richmond - Death Date 10 Jan 1865 age 28 - Birth Date 1837