William Akers 1730 1810

 

William Akers is my 5th Great-Grandfather

 

b. 10-20-1730 NJ

d. 3-31-1810 Campbell County, VA

 

Descendants

 

Mary Akers

William Akers Bryan

Andrew Bryan

Sarah Jane Bryan

Willie Thomas Arthur

Edgar Arthur

David Arthur

 

Private in 5th Virginia Regiment

 

Daughters of the American Revolution DAR# A203133

 

Sons American Revolution Patriot

 

 

 

5th Virginia Regiment Payrolls for Dec. 1776 and Jan. & Feb. 1777 show William Akers as Sergt.

 

William Akers was born in NJ and later moved to PA.

 

William Akers. b. 1730. d. 1810, son of Simon and Mary Akers. m. Elizabeth Martye of Pennsylvania Dutch extraction and whose parents probably came from Germany. He was in Augusta County. Va., in January 1750 when he made appraisement of Wm. Alexander's estate.

 

William Akers' grandfather, Simon Akers, married Sarah Furman. Died intestate in Hunterdon County, New Jersey in 1722. Simon Akers, his son, was administrator of his estate.

 

William Akers' father, Simon Akers who married in Chester County, PA, was living in the Roanoke Settlement, Va. in 1742. His wife's name was Mary. The land in this area of Virginia was widely advertised in Chester and Lancaster Counties, PA and many settlers went from these Pennsylvania counties. It is believed that he moved from Chester County, PA, about 1740.

 

He and his son, William, were listed as members of Company 8, Augusta County, Virginia Militia in 1742 with George Robinson as Captain.

 

His homestead was 240 acres of land in the fork of Tinker Creek and Roanoke River. This is near and east of the present town of Roanoke, Virginia. Although he lived and reared his family on this land, the grant was not recorded until after his death. The land grant records show this: March 10, 1756, Simon Akers, 240 acres in fork of Tinker Creek and Goose Creek (Roanoke River). This area is in present Roanoke Co. VA, formed from Botetourt Co. VA in 1838; Botetourt formed from Augusta Co. VA in 1769. So he was living in Augusta County at that time.

 

Simon Akers and George Robinson were executors in the will of Daniel Monohan, who lived across Tinker Creek from Akers. When Daniel Monohan died, he left an only child, Mary Monohan, born December 8, 1742. He left his property for the maintenance and education of his child. She was cared for one year by Simon Akers for which he received from the estate 4 pounds, 7 shillings. 6 pence on June 18, 1744.

 

Will Book No. 1 shows sale bill of Daniel Monohan's estate, Dec. 8, 1744.

Purchasers: William Akers to a hat, 1 shilling, 1 pence; Mary Akers to flax, 5 shillings; 6 pence; Mary Akers, to yarn, 4 shillings, 1 pence; Simon Akers, to a Rug & blanket, 10 shillings, 10 pence; Simon Akers, to a piece of Flannel, 3 shillings, 9 pence; and others.

 

In 1745 the Court at Orange named Simon Akers as Constable in Capt. George Robinson's Company, and also, ordered George Robinson and Simon Akers to view a road across the mountains. He was appointed road overseer. May 12, 1746, in Augusta County, VA.

 

Simon Akers died in early part of 1749. The record of his will is found in Will Book Xo. 1 as follows: March 9, 1748. Simon Akers' will Wife, Mary Akers; sons, William and Thomas, and their younger brother and sister, Uriah Akers and Ruth Akers. Executors, wife, Mary, and son, William. Teste: Wm. Armstrong, Susanna Armstrong, Nicholas Haile. Presented, May 17, 1749 by Mary and William Akers. Proved by Wm. and Susanna Armstrong.

On the next page: May 17, 1749 Mary and William Akers bond as above with surety John Mills. Then later the following: Dec. 27, 1749, Simon Akers' appraisement by Erwin Patterson, John Mason, and Joseph Robinson. He had horses, cattle, carpenter tools, and other things to the amount of 59 pounds, 19 shillings, 1 pence at the time of his death.

 

 

The Simon Akers land in the fork of Tinker Creek and the Roanoke River was sold to Nathaniel Evans in 1773 by William Akers and Elizabeth, his wife, of Bedford, and Thomas Akers and Mary, his wife, of Botetourt for 225 pounds.

 

In 1755, Wm. Akers was reported by Sheriff of Augusta County to be in Bedford County, Va. He was in that part of Bedford County which became Campbell County in 1782. On Sept. 27. 1782, William Akers of Campbell County made bill of sale to James Alason of Botetourt County. Va.

 

William Akers furnished supplies to the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War for which he received certificate for payment by the County Court of Campbell County, Va., Mar. 7, 1782 and April 4, 1785.

 

William Akers is buried in the second burial ground of Old Concord Presbyterian Church. Now in Appomattox County, the portion previously Campbell County.

 

William lived in Bedford Co., Campbell Co., and is buried in Appomattox Co., all the same place, but changed by formation of new Counties.

 

William Akers' daughter, Mary, born 1754, married Andrew Morrison Bryan, born 1748, and moved to North Carolina, but later returned to Campbell County, VA.

 

Text Box:         Simon Akers land in the fork of Tinker Creek and the Roanoke River
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